wrongjohnsilver:

prettylittlepoisonn:

So pretty.

Victorian architecture is another thing with me.

vegan-art:

"The Pig I Am"  |  Miru Kim

anarcho-queer:

Fact: 5.3 million African American men are denied the right to vote based on a past felony conviction.
That means more than 13% (39 mil) of the general African American population and 28% of the male African American population (18.5 mil) are prohibited from voting.
—  Ten Facts About The Racist Criminal Justice System
Felony Disenfranchisement is highest in the former slave states and states with a history of civil rights violations like Florida and North Carolina. Today’s red states—particularly in the bible belt—where the Republican voting base is strongest, appear to have vested racist and political interests in permanently separating Black people from their right to vote.
This link provides information on each state’s voting laws for those with a felony record.

anarcho-queer:

Fact: 5.3 million African American men are denied the right to vote based on a past felony conviction.

That means more than 13% (39 mil) of the general African American population and 28% of the male African American population (18.5 mil) are prohibited from voting.

—  Ten Facts About The Racist Criminal Justice System

Felony Disenfranchisement is highest in the former slave states and states with a history of civil rights violations like Florida and North Carolina. Today’s red states—particularly in the bible belt—where the Republican voting base is strongest, appear to have vested racist and political interests in permanently separating Black people from their right to vote.

This link provides information on each state’s voting laws for those with a felony record.

zagreussits:

How to wear a knife strapped to your thigh with a garter like a fucking lady while managing not to slice yourself open because you were fool enough to carry an unsheathed weapon next to a squishy part of your body that moves when you walk.

  1. Get a garter from somewhere; this one is a sock garter from Sock Dreams, which means it’s made to stay the fuck up there.
  2. Get a fucking sheath for those sharp, pointy things and put them in the sheath. There’ll be a velcro loop at the top so that they won’t slide out if you hold the sheath upside down.
  3. Put the garter through the loop at the top meant for whatever you’re using to attach it to yourself. Attach it to yourself, adjusting for ease of grabbing. You don’t want to put it on your inner thigh because that is awkward as hell to get out. The only way you’d be able to get it out in a timely manner is if you attached the sheath upside down, at which point you’d need two garters to keep the sheath from tilting inward toward your other thigh.
  4. Oh no, now the sheath is hanging loosely and is going to make a weird pattern against your clothing. Tuck that shit into your stockings if you’re wearing them, or use another garter if you’re not.
  5. Pull your pencil skirt back down over the knife sheath. Adjust accordingly due to tightness of skirt and shape of sheath. Make sure you can get at it as quick as you want.
  6. People look at you really strangely if this is the knife you pull out when you want to cut your apple up.
im-horngry:

Vegan Burgers - As Requested!

im-horngry:

Vegan Burgers - As Requested!

bravoavocado:

just found the carnist meme

thepeoplesrecord:

Pre-school-to-Prison Pipeline: Studies confirm the dehumanization of Black childrenApril 6, 2014
Although African-Americans constitute only 13 percent of all Americans, nearly half of all prison inmates in the U.S. are black. This startling statistic has led the United Nations Human Rights Committee to publicly criticize the U.S. for its treatment of African-Americans. A number of recent studies and reports paint a damning picture of how American society dehumanizes blacks starting from early childhood.
Racial justice activists and prison abolition groups have long argued that the “school-to-prison” pipeline funnels young black kids into the criminal justice system, with higher rates of school suspension and arrest compared with nonblack kids for the same infractions. More than 20 years ago, Smith College professor Ann Arnett Ferguson wrote a groundbreaking book based on her three-year study of how black boys in particular are perceived differently starting in school. In “Bad Boys: Public Schools in the Making of Black Masculinity,” Ferguson laid out the ways in which educators and administrators funneled black male students into the juvenile justice system based on perceived differences between them and other students.
Today this trend continues with record numbers of suspensions as a result of “zero-tolerance” school policies and the increasing presence of campus police officers who arrest students for insubordination, fights and other types of behavior that might be considered normal “acting out” in school-aged children. In fact, black youth are far more likely to be suspended from school than any other race. They also face disproportionate expulsion and arrest rates, and once children enter the juvenile justice system they are far more likely to be incarcerated as adults.
Even the Justice Department under President Obama has understood what a serious problem this is, issuing a set of new guidelines earlier this year to curb discriminatory suspension in school
But it turns out that negative disciplinary actions affect African-American children starting as early as age 3. The U.S. Department of Education just released a comprehensive study of public schools, revealing in a report that black children face discrimination even in preschool. (That preschool-aged children are suspended at all is hugely disturbing.) Data from the 2011-2012 year show that although black children make up only 18 percent of preschoolers, 42 percent of them were suspended at least once and 48 percent were suspended multiple times.
Consistent with this educational data and taking into account broader demographic, family and economic data for children of various races, broken down by state, is a newer study released this week by the Annie E. Casey Foundation that found African-American children are on the lowest end of nearly every measured index including proficiency in math and reading, high school graduation, poverty and parental education. The report, titled Race for Results, plainly says, “The index scores for African-American children should be considered a national crisis.”
Two other studies published recently offer specific evidence of how black children are so disadvantaged at an early age. One research project, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, examined how college students and police officers estimated the ages of children who they were told had committed crimes. Both groups studied by UCLA professor Phillip Goff and collaborators were more likely to overestimate the ages of black children compared with nonblack ones, implying that black children were seen as “significantly less innocent” than others. The authors wrote:

We expected … that individuals would perceive Black boys as being more responsible for their actions and as being more appropriate targets for police violence. We find support for these hypotheses … and converging evidence that Black boys are seen as older and less innocent and that they prompt a less essential conception of childhood than do their White same-age peers.

Another study by researchers at UC Riverside found that teachers tended to be more likely to evaluate black children negatively than nonblack ones who were engaged in pretend play. Psychology professor Tuppett M. Yates, who led the study, observed 171 preschool-aged children interacting with stuffed toys and other props and evaluated them for how imaginative and creative they were. In an interview on Uprising, Yates told me that all the children, regardless of race, were “similarly imaginative and similarly expressive,” but when their teachers evaluated those same children at a later time, there was a discriminatory effect. Yates explained, “For white children, imaginative and expressive players were rated very positively [by teachers] but the reverse was true for black children. Imaginative and expressive black children were perceived as less ready for school, as less accepted by their peers, and as greater sources of conflict and tension.”
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Pre-school-to-Prison Pipeline: Studies confirm the dehumanization of Black children
April 6, 2014

Although African-Americans constitute only 13 percent of all Americansnearly half of all prison inmates in the U.S. are black. This startling statistic has led the United Nations Human Rights Committee to publicly criticize the U.S. for its treatment of African-Americans. A number of recent studies and reports paint a damning picture of how American society dehumanizes blacks starting from early childhood.

Racial justice activists and prison abolition groups have long argued that the “school-to-prison” pipeline funnels young black kids into the criminal justice system, with higher rates of school suspension and arrest compared with nonblack kids for the same infractions. More than 20 years ago, Smith College professor Ann Arnett Ferguson wrote a groundbreaking book based on her three-year study of how black boys in particular are perceived differently starting in school. In “Bad Boys: Public Schools in the Making of Black Masculinity,” Ferguson laid out the ways in which educators and administrators funneled black male students into the juvenile justice system based on perceived differences between them and other students.

Today this trend continues with record numbers of suspensions as a result of “zero-tolerance” school policies and the increasing presence of campus police officers who arrest students for insubordination, fights and other types of behavior that might be considered normal “acting out” in school-aged children. In fact, black youth are far more likely to be suspended from school than any other race. They also face disproportionate expulsion and arrest rates, and once children enter the juvenile justice system they are far more likely to be incarcerated as adults.

Even the Justice Department under President Obama has understood what a serious problem this is, issuing a set of new guidelines earlier this year to curb discriminatory suspension in school

But it turns out that negative disciplinary actions affect African-American children starting as early as age 3. The U.S. Department of Education just released a comprehensive study of public schools, revealing in a report that black children face discrimination even in preschool. (That preschool-aged children are suspended at all is hugely disturbing.) Data from the 2011-2012 year show that although black children make up only 18 percent of preschoolers, 42 percent of them were suspended at least once and 48 percent were suspended multiple times.

Consistent with this educational data and taking into account broader demographic, family and economic data for children of various races, broken down by state, is a newer study released this week by the Annie E. Casey Foundation that found African-American children are on the lowest end of nearly every measured index including proficiency in math and reading, high school graduation, poverty and parental education. The report, titled Race for Results, plainly says, “The index scores for African-American children should be considered a national crisis.”

Two other studies published recently offer specific evidence of how black children are so disadvantaged at an early age. One research project, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, examined how college students and police officers estimated the ages of children who they were told had committed crimes. Both groups studied by UCLA professor Phillip Goff and collaborators were more likely to overestimate the ages of black children compared with nonblack ones, implying that black children were seen as “significantly less innocent” than others. The authors wrote:

We expected … that individuals would perceive Black boys as being more responsible for their actions and as being more appropriate targets for police violence. We find support for these hypotheses … and converging evidence that Black boys are seen as older and less innocent and that they prompt a less essential conception of childhood than do their White same-age peers.

Another study by researchers at UC Riverside found that teachers tended to be more likely to evaluate black children negatively than nonblack ones who were engaged in pretend play. Psychology professor Tuppett M. Yates, who led the study, observed 171 preschool-aged children interacting with stuffed toys and other props and evaluated them for how imaginative and creative they were. In an interview on Uprising, Yates told me that all the children, regardless of race, were “similarly imaginative and similarly expressive,” but when their teachers evaluated those same children at a later time, there was a discriminatory effect. Yates explained, “For white children, imaginative and expressive players were rated very positively [by teachers] but the reverse was true for black children. Imaginative and expressive black children were perceived as less ready for school, as less accepted by their peers, and as greater sources of conflict and tension.”

Full article

anarchy-in-the-ak:

cjwho:

Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman | via

Forget about Mona Lisa the 2D painting, Zaria Forman, a New York based artist, created these amazing 3D paintings by using waves of thick paint for the creation of water and icebergs. These paintings are based on Greenlands icebergs and mountains and she made them for her late mother.

In the first image you see Zaria working on creating the icebergs on a half finished canvas.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

Heres modern art I can enjoy

queer-sports:

Apparently there was a group of Native Americans protesting the Cleveland Indian’s racist mascot, Chief Wahoo, outside Progressive Field before an Indians game, and this totally-not-racist fan (we know this because allegedly he stated he had Native friends) decided to confront them IN FULL RED FACE AND A CHEAP HEADDRESS. 

Much respect for the man on the left for not killing that racist right then and there.

queer-sports:

Apparently there was a group of Native Americans protesting the Cleveland Indian’s racist mascot, Chief Wahoo, outside Progressive Field before an Indians game, and this totally-not-racist fan (we know this because allegedly he stated he had Native friends) decided to confront them IN FULL RED FACE AND A CHEAP HEADDRESS.

Much respect for the man on the left for not killing that racist right then and there.

humanelongisland:




‪#‎GoVegan‬ and help save 100+ animals a year.

humanelongisland:

‪#‎GoVegan‬ and help save 100+ animals a year.
thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Rape - TX Gov. Rick Perry refuses to comply with rules to curb prison rapeApril 5, 2014
Five of the ten worst facilities in the United States for sexual assaults in prison are in Texas, according to a 2008 study by the Department of Justice. “In those five prisons, between 9 percent and 16 percent of all inmates report incidents of rape by fellow prisoners and prison staff,” according to the Dallas Voice. But Texas Governor Rick Perry (R) said last week that he doesn’t plan on complying with new federal standards to curb these assaults.
The standards set by the Department of Justice come more than a decade after federal legislation was passed to address an epidemic of sexual assaults behind bars, particularly among teens and LGBT individuals. They impose basic requirements, such as separating teens from adults, eliminating cross-gender pat-downs in teen and juvenile units, and allotting a certain number of staff to juvenile facilities.
Perry said in a letter to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder last week that these requirements are not feasible for Texas, particularly because the state — unlike the federal government — considers 17 and 18-year-old inmates adults. Perry said it is too costly to separate those individuals from other adult prisoners, and that the cost of adding the required number of staff to some facilities would be “unacceptable” in some jurisdictions.
Just Detention International, an organization focused on sexual abuse “in all forms of detention,” said Perry’s response “ignores the overwhelming evidence of a human rights crisis in Texas prisons.”
The organization rebuts Perry’s claim that the regulations were developed in a vacuum, noting that during one of several public comment periods, Texas corrections department head Brad Livingston wrote to the Department of Justice in 2010, “it is apparent the Department of Justice gave careful consideration to the comments submitted by many interested parties during 2010, the TDCJ has few issues relating to the proposed national standards.”
Just Detention reports that it receives more letters from victims of sexual abuse in Texas than anywhere else, including anecdotes that those who try to report the abuse are threatened into silence. While Perry claims the state has achieved an 84 percent reduction in assaults on its own, Just Detenion suggests those figures may instead reflect “the risk of retaliation for speaking out against sexual violence.”
Nationwide, 1 in 8 detained juveniles are sexually assaulted, according to a Bureau of Justice 2010 survey. And LGBT individuals are 15 times more likely to be assaulted.

While federal facilities are obligated to comply with these new rules, state facilities can opt not to comply in exchange for losing five percent of their federal funding.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Rape - TX Gov. Rick Perry refuses to comply with rules to curb prison rape
April 5, 2014

Five of the ten worst facilities in the United States for sexual assaults in prison are in Texas, according to a 2008 study by the Department of Justice. “In those five prisons, between 9 percent and 16 percent of all inmates report incidents of rape by fellow prisoners and prison staff,” according to the Dallas Voice. But Texas Governor Rick Perry (R) said last week that he doesn’t plan on complying with new federal standards to curb these assaults.

The standards set by the Department of Justice come more than a decade after federal legislation was passed to address an epidemic of sexual assaults behind bars, particularly among teens and LGBT individuals. They impose basic requirements, such as separating teens from adults, eliminating cross-gender pat-downs in teen and juvenile units, and allotting a certain number of staff to juvenile facilities.

Perry said in a letter to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder last week that these requirements are not feasible for Texas, particularly because the state — unlike the federal government — considers 17 and 18-year-old inmates adults. Perry said it is too costly to separate those individuals from other adult prisoners, and that the cost of adding the required number of staff to some facilities would be “unacceptable” in some jurisdictions.

Just Detention International, an organization focused on sexual abuse “in all forms of detention,” said Perry’s response “ignores the overwhelming evidence of a human rights crisis in Texas prisons.”

The organization rebuts Perry’s claim that the regulations were developed in a vacuum, noting that during one of several public comment periods, Texas corrections department head Brad Livingston wrote to the Department of Justice in 2010, “it is apparent the Department of Justice gave careful consideration to the comments submitted by many interested parties during 2010, the TDCJ has few issues relating to the proposed national standards.”

Just Detention reports that it receives more letters from victims of sexual abuse in Texas than anywhere else, including anecdotes that those who try to report the abuse are threatened into silence. While Perry claims the state has achieved an 84 percent reduction in assaults on its own, Just Detenion suggests those figures may instead reflect “the risk of retaliation for speaking out against sexual violence.”

Nationwide, 1 in 8 detained juveniles are sexually assaulted, according to a Bureau of Justice 2010 survey. And LGBT individuals are 15 times more likely to be assaulted.

While federal facilities are obligated to comply with these new rules, state facilities can opt not to comply in exchange for losing five percent of their federal funding.

Source

blackourstory:

WHY DIDN’T THEY TEACH YOU ABOUT THIS IN HISTORY CLASS?

The Christian Movement for Life, aka, MOVE

  • a pro-green, vegan, anti-technology group
  • living in a house in West Philadelphia
  • BOMBED by the Philly PD, from the air, on May 13, 1985
  • YES, 1985!!!
  • the city killed 11 people (5 children), burned down 65 homes in a Black, middle-class, West Philly neighborhood, and caused $50,000,000.00 damage - all to “evict” the group and recover two shotguns
  • You know of Mumia Abu-Jamal (3rd photo from bottom) but did you know he was affiliated with MOVE?
  • Ramona Africa (2nd photo from bottom) and one child survived
  • MOVE leader John Africa was murdered that day

This was not the ONLY time an American city was bombed, btw. The first time, it was ALSO whites bombing Black people. And you want to talk about TERRORISM??? 

And what else don’t you know about your country and it’s treatment of Black people?

Get to Googling… AND Youtubing…

savleighm:

The fact that Sir Patrick Stewart and Sir Ian Mckellen are best friends in real life makes me so happy

x