animalconnectiontx:


DFW TEXAS: Please join us in a protest against DHL demanding an end to animal transports to laboratories!
Protest details: [x].
The international campaign against ABX Air/DHL aims to cut the supply of animals to laboratories in the US by targeting the carriers that fly these animals from breeding/trapping facilities overseas. And ABX Air is the only known cargo carrier transporting primates from China & South East Asia.
Why DHL: We need to hit them where their paycheck comes from. ABX Air’s main customer is DHL, an international cargo company, and the vast majority of the freight it carries is for that company. Most of ABX Air’s aircraft are even painted with DHL’s colors. We want to put pressure on DHL to insist that ABX Air cease animal transports, or end their partnership.
No animals, no vivisection. Help us cut off their supply! PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST!

animalconnectiontx:

DFW TEXAS: Please join us in a protest against DHL demanding an end to animal transports to laboratories!

Protest details: [x].

The international campaign against ABX Air/DHL aims to cut the supply of animals to laboratories in the US by targeting the carriers that fly these animals from breeding/trapping facilities overseas. And ABX Air is the only known cargo carrier transporting primates from China & South East Asia.

Why DHL: We need to hit them where their paycheck comes from. ABX Air’s main customer is DHL, an international cargo company, and the vast majority of the freight it carries is for that company. Most of ABX Air’s aircraft are even painted with DHL’s colors. We want to put pressure on DHL to insist that ABX Air cease animal transports, or end their partnership.

No animals, no vivisection. Help us cut off their supply! PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST!

thepeoplesrecord:

Today in history: 16th Street Baptist Church bombing of 1963September 15, 2014
The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was used as a meeting-place for civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King, Ralph David Abernathy and Fred Shutterworth. Tensions became high when the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) became involved in a campaign to register African American to vote in Birmingham.
On Sunday, 15th September, 1963, a white man was seen getting out of a white and turquoise Chevrolet car and placing a box under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Soon afterwards, at 10.22 a.m., the bomb exploded killing Denise McNair (11), Addie Mae Collins (14), Carole Robertson (14) and Cynthia Wesley (14). The four girls had been attending Sunday school classes at the church. Twenty-three other people were also hurt by the blast.
Civil rights activists blamed George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, for the killings. Only a week before the bombing he had told the New York Times that to stop integration Alabama needed a “few first-class funerals.”
A witness identified Robert Chambliss, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, as the man who placed the bomb under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. He was arrested and charged with murder and possessing a box of 122 sticks of dynamite without a permit. On 8th October, 1963, Chambliss was found not guilty of murder and received a hundred-dollar fine and a six-month jail sentence for having the dynamite.
The case was unsolved until Bill Baxley was elected attorney general of Alabama. He requested the original Federal Bureau of Investigation files on the case and discovered that the organization had accumulated a great deal of evidence against Chambliss that had not been used in the original trial.
In November, 1977 Chambliss was tried once again for the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Now aged 73, Chambliss was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. Chambliss died in an Alabama prison on 29th October, 1985.
On 17th May, 2000, the FBI announced that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing had been carried out by the Ku Klux Klan splinter group, the Cahaba Boys. It was claimed that four men, Robert Chambliss, Herman Cash, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Cherry had been responsible for the crime. Cash was dead but Blanton and Cherry were arrested and Blanton has since been tried and convicted.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Today in history: 16th Street Baptist Church bombing of 1963
September 15, 2014

The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was used as a meeting-place for civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King, Ralph David Abernathy and Fred Shutterworth. Tensions became high when the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) became involved in a campaign to register African American to vote in Birmingham.

On Sunday, 15th September, 1963, a white man was seen getting out of a white and turquoise Chevrolet car and placing a box under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Soon afterwards, at 10.22 a.m., the bomb exploded killing Denise McNair (11), Addie Mae Collins (14), Carole Robertson (14) and Cynthia Wesley (14). The four girls had been attending Sunday school classes at the church. Twenty-three other people were also hurt by the blast.

Civil rights activists blamed George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, for the killings. Only a week before the bombing he had told the New York Times that to stop integration Alabama needed a “few first-class funerals.”

A witness identified Robert Chambliss, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, as the man who placed the bomb under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. He was arrested and charged with murder and possessing a box of 122 sticks of dynamite without a permit. On 8th October, 1963, Chambliss was found not guilty of murder and received a hundred-dollar fine and a six-month jail sentence for having the dynamite.

The case was unsolved until Bill Baxley was elected attorney general of Alabama. He requested the original Federal Bureau of Investigation files on the case and discovered that the organization had accumulated a great deal of evidence against Chambliss that had not been used in the original trial.

In November, 1977 Chambliss was tried once again for the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Now aged 73, Chambliss was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. Chambliss died in an Alabama prison on 29th October, 1985.

On 17th May, 2000, the FBI announced that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing had been carried out by the Ku Klux Klan splinter group, the Cahaba Boys. It was claimed that four men, Robert Chambliss, Herman Cash, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Cherry had been responsible for the crime. Cash was dead but Blanton and Cherry were arrested and Blanton has since been tried and convicted.

Source

adviceforvegans:

Being vegan is not limited to animal rights. Being vegan is about standing up all sentient beings, including humans. This is why vegans cannot buy from brands such as Nike or shop at Primark. Why? Because these places supply from sweatshops. I’m sure you’re probably wondering what a sweatshop is exactly and what on earth it has to do with veganism. So I’m here to explain it to you. Here are some not-so-fun facts about sweatshops (all sourced of course):UNITE, the US garment workers union, defines a ”sweatshop” as any factory that does not respect workers’ right to organise an independent union. Global Exchange and other anti-sweatshop movements would add that a sweatshop is any work place that does not pay its workers a Living Wage, that is enough money to live off and support the basic needs of their families.Workers in sweatshops can be fined on a daily basis. In some sweatshops workers are fined for arriving late, taking too long in the toilet, forgetting to turn lights off and making mistakes. A fine can cost up to two months’ pay: if workers cannot afford to pay fines they are unable to quit their job and are effectively enslaved.At one Mexican sweatshop, workers are expected to meet a quota of 1,000 pieces a day. That could mean creating 1,000 jeans, 1,000 shoes or 1,000 rugby balls a day, depending on the product a factory produces. For the Mexican workers to meet this quota they would need to create MORE than one piece a minute. This quota is so high that the workers are unable to have a drink or go to the toilet all day.Over 75% of people working in clothing sweatshops are women. Many are mothers, and the long hours and little pay can often take its toll on their families. Children often see little of their parents, and in many countries can’t be sent to school due to lack of money to afford to pay fees.In May 2011 a report on Asian sportswear supply chains highlighted how factories supplying multinational sports and garment brands are routinely breaking labour rights laws. Some factories denied workers the legal minimum wage, while others linked the payment of basic wages to unachievable production targets which workers struggled desperately to meet.More than 300 garment workers were sacked in Cambodia after taking a stand to demand their right to a living wage. According to a recent Cambodian living wage study, garment workers need £60 a month to support their families instead of the £38 the factory was paying them.In February 1997, 200 Vietnamese sweatshop workers fell ill and were hospitalised by over exposure to acetane, a chemical solvent used in production of McDonalds Happy Meal toys. Despite such incidents the factory reportedly refused to improve its ventilation system for its workers.Workers at the Yongshen toy factory in China share filthy, overcrowded dormitories infested with bed bugs. Twenty-four workers share each room, sleeping in narrow triple-level metal beds. Twenty-four workers must share a toilet and in the sweltering summer heat must work drenched in their own sweat. The Yongshen factory produces toys for Hasbro and for RC2 the makers of popular Bratz dolls. Of the total retail cost of a garment, less than 1% is shared between the people who made it in many sweatshops.It is not uncommon for people who try to fight for better conditions in sweatshops to be persecuted. Trade union leader Anwar Ansari, producing clothes for M&S in India, claims he was kidnapped and brutally beaten on August 25th 2010. "I am exhausted to death now…. None of us have time to go to toilet or drink water. The supervisors are pressuring and nagging us all the time. We are tired and dirty. We work without stop and we are still reproached by the supervisors.” - Worker making New Balance shoes, in China for the Beijing Olympics. Many footballs are hand stitched in sweatshops by children who are under paid and over worked. On the World day against Child Labour in 2006 some of these children were given the opportunity to play with these footballs for the first time, as they were taken from the factories they worked in and enrolled in schools set up by the UN.In 2005 the building of the Spectrum/Shahriyar Sweater factory in Bangladesh collapsed killing 64 workers and injuring 80. These deaths were entirely preventable. The building collapsed as a result of factory owners violating building codes and health and safety regulations.Foxconn, a major firm responsible for the assembly of Apple products was forced to investigate conditions at one of its Chinese factories following a string of 17 employee suicides.Trade Unions play a vital role in ensuring workers across the world can achieve a Living wage and decent working conditions. Unions give workers the confidence to say things together that they would be too scared to say on their own. But many factories find ways to prevent their employees forming trade unions.Workers producing basic teeshirts for Asda In Bangladesh are earning just a quarter of the amount they need to properly feed, clothe and educate their families. ActionAid’s report, Asda: Poverty Guaranteed, says Asda could easily turn this around by paying workers an extra 2p on each £4 t-shirt it buys.A survey of 10 factories in Bangladesh found that no factory had a regular working week of less than 60 hours, more than half exceeded this and four of the factories were found to have average working weeks of over 80 hours. In the UK a basic working week is 48 hours.Many sweatshops are monitored by inspectors who are paid by the clothing industry. Often they will call ahead of inspection giving factory owners time to tidy the work floor, get rid of child workers and coach employees about what to say.Many female factory workers cannot risk becoming pregnant for fear of being fired. Some supervisors treat female workers so severely that they must return to work sooner than two weeks after giving birth or lose their jobs.On the 25th of February 2010, 21 workers were killed and 50 injured after a fire at a sweater factory in Bangladesh. The fire caused by an electric short circuit quickly spread through the factory fuelled by the inflammable materials stored there. Workers could not escape through the fire exits which were locked and stairways were blocked with materials.One factory in Leicester was discovered by a Channel 4 Dispatches documentary to be paying workers £2.50 an hour – less half the minimum wage. Many of the employees were in the UK on student visas, working illegally, and had no way of challenging their exploitative conditions.Violence in sweatshops is sadly a common occurrence. A recent report carried out by the National Labour Committee found that employees at sweatshops producing lingerie for the Victoria’s Secret brand, could be slapped or beaten by supervisors for making minor errors or falling behind on their production goals.Sometimes simply closing a sweatshop down is not the answer as it forces the workers to seek alternative employment. After US Senator Tom Harkin’s Child Labour Deterrence Act was introduced in the 1990s, an estimated 50,000 children were dismissed from their garment industry jobs in Asia, leaving many to resort to jobs such as stone-crushing, street hustling, and prostitution.At one British Sweatshop an undercover reporter discovered there was no central heating in some parts of the building and employees were forced to work in freezing cold conditions throughout the winter. The same reporter found herself trapped in the female toilet after boxes stacked in front of the door fell and blocked her exit.Distressed denim is often created by a process called sand-blasting. Workers fire sand under high pressure at jeans, and this sand breaks down into fine silica sand particles, which workers inhale and this often causes the fatal lung disease Silicosis. In Turkey alone, 47 former sandblasting operators are known to have died as a direct result of sandblasting related Silicosis.Thousands of people across the world are employed as home workers, producing goods for the UK high street from home. Whilst home working can be a positive choice for some, home workers are often the most exploited workers in the industry. They have precarious employment status, a lack of legal protection and are isolated from fellow workers which makes it difficult for them to become involved in trade unions.A Social Audit is an inspection of working conditions in factories. A typical audit will involve: 1. a document review: wage sheets, time sheets and personal records are examined. 2. Site Inspection: this is a tour of the factory to check for any health and safety problems and observe the workers. 3. Interviews: managers, supervisors and workers are all interviewed. The best audits also consult the workers trade unions and local labour rights groups.There are many different sweatshops across the world producing a wide variety products. Some of the worst industries are shoes, clothing, rugs, toys, chocolate, bananas and coffee.Factory workers in El Salvador, Spain producing products for labels including Adidas, Reebok, Puma and Gap recently won major improvements to their workplace following the release of a negative report on conditions at the factory. Previously sealed doors and windows were opened to improve ventilation and fans have been installed. Workers are now provided with detailed pay stubbs in Spanish detailing the hours they are paid for and noting pay rates and any deductions to pay.In November 2005 The International Labour Rights Fund filed a lawsuit in the U.S. that charged Coca Cola and its bottling facility in Turkey with torture of Union activists and their families. The International Labour Rights Fund alleged that employees were beaten with clubs, tear gassed, and then jailed in an effort to force the employees to abandon union efforts.See more here.Also check out sweatshop free shopping!

adviceforvegans:

Being vegan is not limited to animal rights. Being vegan is about standing up all sentient beings, including humans. This is why vegans cannot buy from brands such as Nike or shop at Primark. Why? Because these places supply from sweatshops. 

I’m sure you’re probably wondering what a sweatshop is exactly and what on earth it has to do with veganism. So I’m here to explain it to you. Here are some not-so-fun facts about sweatshops (all sourced of course):

UNITE, the US garment workers union, defines a ”sweatshop” as any factory that does not respect workers’ right to organise an independent union. Global Exchange and other anti-sweatshop movements would add that a sweatshop is any work place that does not pay its workers a Living Wage, that is enough money to live off and support the basic needs of their families.

Workers in sweatshops can be fined on a daily basis. In some sweatshops workers are fined for arriving late, taking too long in the toilet, forgetting to turn lights off and making mistakes. A fine can cost up to two months’ pay: if workers cannot afford to pay fines they are unable to quit their job and are effectively enslaved.

At one Mexican sweatshop, workers are expected to meet a quota of 1,000 pieces a day. That could mean creating 1,000 jeans, 1,000 shoes or 1,000 rugby balls a day, depending on the product a factory produces. For the Mexican workers to meet this quota they would need to create MORE than one piece a minute. This quota is so high that the workers are unable to have a drink or go to the toilet all day.

Over 75% of people working in clothing sweatshops are women. Many are mothers, and the long hours and little pay can often take its toll on their families. Children often see little of their parents, and in many countries can’t be sent to school due to lack of money to afford to pay fees.

In May 2011 a report on Asian sportswear supply chains highlighted how factories supplying multinational sports and garment brands are routinely breaking labour rights laws. Some factories denied workers the legal minimum wage, while others linked the payment of basic wages to unachievable production targets which workers struggled desperately to meet.

More than 300 garment workers were sacked in Cambodia after taking a stand to demand their right to a living wage. According to a recent Cambodian living wage study, garment workers need £60 a month to support their families instead of the £38 the factory was paying them.

In February 1997, 200 Vietnamese sweatshop workers fell ill and were hospitalised by over exposure to acetane, a chemical solvent used in production of McDonalds Happy Meal toys. Despite such incidents the factory reportedly refused to improve its ventilation system for its workers.

Workers at the Yongshen toy factory in China share filthy, overcrowded dormitories infested with bed bugs. Twenty-four workers share each room, sleeping in narrow triple-level metal beds. Twenty-four workers must share a toilet and in the sweltering summer heat must work drenched in their own sweat. The Yongshen factory produces toys for Hasbro and for RC2 the makers of popular Bratz dolls. 

Of the total retail cost of a garment, less than 1% is shared between the people who made it in many sweatshops.

It is not uncommon for people who try to fight for better conditions in sweatshops to be persecuted. Trade union leader Anwar Ansari, producing clothes for M&S in India, claims he was kidnapped and brutally beaten on August 25th 2010. 

"I am exhausted to death now…. None of us have time to go to toilet or drink water. The supervisors are pressuring and nagging us all the time. We are tired and dirty. We work without stop and we are still reproached by the supervisors.” - Worker making New Balance shoes, in China for the Beijing Olympics. 

Many footballs are hand stitched in sweatshops by children who are under paid and over worked. On the World day against Child Labour in 2006 some of these children were given the opportunity to play with these footballs for the first time, as they were taken from the factories they worked in and enrolled in schools set up by the UN.

In 2005 the building of the Spectrum/Shahriyar Sweater factory in Bangladesh collapsed killing 64 workers and injuring 80. These deaths were entirely preventable. The building collapsed as a result of factory owners violating building codes and health and safety regulations.

Foxconn, a major firm responsible for the assembly of Apple products was forced to investigate conditions at one of its Chinese factories following a string of 17 employee suicides.

Trade Unions play a vital role in ensuring workers across the world can achieve a Living wage and decent working conditions. Unions give workers the confidence to say things together that they would be too scared to say on their own. But many factories find ways to prevent their employees forming trade unions.

Workers producing basic teeshirts for Asda In Bangladesh are earning just a quarter of the amount they need to properly feed, clothe and educate their families. ActionAid’s report, Asda: Poverty Guaranteed, says Asda could easily turn this around by paying workers an extra 2p on each £4 t-shirt it buys.

A survey of 10 factories in Bangladesh found that no factory had a regular working week of less than 60 hours, more than half exceeded this and four of the factories were found to have average working weeks of over 80 hours. In the UK a basic working week is 48 hours.

Many sweatshops are monitored by inspectors who are paid by the clothing industry. Often they will call ahead of inspection giving factory owners time to tidy the work floor, get rid of child workers and coach employees about what to say.

Many female factory workers cannot risk becoming pregnant for fear of being fired. Some supervisors treat female workers so severely that they must return to work sooner than two weeks after giving birth or lose their jobs.

On the 25th of February 2010, 21 workers were killed and 50 injured after a fire at a sweater factory in Bangladesh. The fire caused by an electric short circuit quickly spread through the factory fuelled by the inflammable materials stored there. Workers could not escape through the fire exits which were locked and stairways were blocked with materials.

One factory in Leicester was discovered by a Channel 4 Dispatches documentary to be paying workers £2.50 an hour – less half the minimum wage. Many of the employees were in the UK on student visas, working illegally, and had no way of challenging their exploitative conditions.

Violence in sweatshops is sadly a common occurrence. A recent report carried out by the National Labour Committee found that employees at sweatshops producing lingerie for the Victoria’s Secret brand, could be slapped or beaten by supervisors for making minor errors or falling behind on their production goals.

Sometimes simply closing a sweatshop down is not the answer as it forces the workers to seek alternative employment. After US Senator Tom Harkin’s Child Labour Deterrence Act was introduced in the 1990s, an estimated 50,000 children were dismissed from their garment industry jobs in Asia, leaving many to resort to jobs such as stone-crushing, street hustling, and prostitution.

At one British Sweatshop an undercover reporter discovered there was no central heating in some parts of the building and employees were forced to work in freezing cold conditions throughout the winter. The same reporter found herself trapped in the female toilet after boxes stacked in front of the door fell and blocked her exit.

Distressed denim is often created by a process called sand-blasting. Workers fire sand under high pressure at jeans, and this sand breaks down into fine silica sand particles, which workers inhale and this often causes the fatal lung disease Silicosis. In Turkey alone, 47 former sandblasting operators are known to have died as a direct result of sandblasting related Silicosis.

Thousands of people across the world are employed as home workers, producing goods for the UK high street from home. Whilst home working can be a positive choice for some, home workers are often the most exploited workers in the industry. They have precarious employment status, a lack of legal protection and are isolated from fellow workers which makes it difficult for them to become involved in trade unions.

A Social Audit is an inspection of working conditions in factories. A typical audit will involve: 

1. a document review: wage sheets, time sheets and personal records are examined. 

2. Site Inspection: this is a tour of the factory to check for any health and safety problems and observe the workers. 

3. Interviews: managers, supervisors and workers are all interviewed. The best audits also consult the workers trade unions and local labour rights groups.

There are many different sweatshops across the world producing a wide variety products. Some of the worst industries are shoes, clothing, rugs, toys, chocolate, bananas and coffee.

Factory workers in El Salvador, Spain producing products for labels including Adidas, Reebok, Puma and Gap recently won major improvements to their workplace following the release of a negative report on conditions at the factory. Previously sealed doors and windows were opened to improve ventilation and fans have been installed. Workers are now provided with detailed pay stubbs in Spanish detailing the hours they are paid for and noting pay rates and any deductions to pay.

In November 2005 The International Labour Rights Fund filed a lawsuit in the U.S. that charged Coca Cola and its bottling facility in Turkey with torture of Union activists and their families. The International Labour Rights Fund alleged that employees were beaten with clubs, tear gassed, and then jailed in an effort to force the employees to abandon union efforts.

See more here.
Also check out sweatshop free shopping!

809:

why is this so hard for people to understand

thepeoplesrecord:

Palestinians express solidarity with the people of FergusonAugust 17, 2014
We the undersigned Palestinian individuals and groups express our solidarity with the family of Michael Brown, a young unarmed black man gunned down by police on August 9th in Ferguson, Missouri. We wish to express our support and solidarity with the people of Ferguson who have taken their struggle to the street, facing a militarized police occupation.
From all factions and sectors of our dislocated society, we send you our commitment to stand with you in your hour of pain and time of struggle against the oppression that continues to target our black brothers and sisters in nearly every aspect of their lives.
We understand your moral outrage. We empathize with your hurt and anger. We understand the impulse to rebel against the infrastructure of a racist capitalist system that systematically pushes you to the margins of humanity.  
And we stand with you.
We recognize the disregard and disrespect for black bodies and black life endemic to the supremacist system that rules the land with wanton brutality. Your struggles through the ages have been an inspiration to us as we fight our own battles for basic human dignities. We continue to find inspiration and strength from your struggles through the ages and your revolutionary leaders, like Malcolm X, Huey Newton, Kwame Ture, Angela Davis, Fred Hampton, Bobby Seale and others.
We honor the life of Michael Brown, cut short less than a week before he was due to begin university.  And we honor the far too many more killed in similar circumstances, motivated by racism and contempt for black life: Ezell Ford, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Tarika Wilson, Malcolm Ferguson, Renisha McBride, Amadou Diallo, Yvette Smith, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell, Kathryn Johnston, Rekia Boyd and too many others to count.
With a Black Power fist in the air, we salute the people of Ferguson and join in your demands for justice.
Signatories
Susan Abulhawa, novelist and activist
Linah Alsaafin, graduate student, SOAS
Budour Hassan
Rinad Abdulla, Professor, Birzeit University
Ramzy Baroud, Managing Editor, Middle East Eye
Diana Buttu, Lawyer, Palestine
Rana Baker, graduate student, SOAS
Abbas Hamideh, activist and organizer
Abir Kopty
Ahlam Muhtaseb, Professor, CSU
Alaa Milbes, Ramallah, Palestine
Alaa Marwan, Ramallah, Palestine
Nour Joudah, Washington DC
Ali Zbeidat, Sakhnin, Palestine
Areej Alragabi , Jerusalem, Palestine
Areej Saeb, student, Jerusalem
Asma Jaber
Beesan Ramadan, Nablus
Dina Zbidat, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Dr Jess Ghannam, UCSF
Huwaida Arraf, Attorney, New York
Nejma Awad, Tetra Tech DPK
Monadel Herzallah, USPCN, San Francisco Bay Area
Ghassan Hussein
Dinna Omar
Randa C. Issa
Amal Khoury, MD MPH, Washington, DC
Amani Barakat Moorpark, California
Fadi Quran 
Fajr Harb
Falastine Dwikat, PCACBI
Hala Gabriel
Khaled Jarrar
Osama Ahmad, AMP Bay Area director
Hala Turjman
Halla Shoaibi, Birzeit University
Harun Arsalai  
Zaid Shuaibi
Hurriyah Ziada
Dima Eleiwa, Shujaiyah, Gaza, Palestine
Jamil Salem, Birzeit University
Karam Saleem, International Solidarity Movement, Palestine
Khaled Barakat
Khuzama Hanoon, Palestine
Laila Awartani, Ramallah, Palestine
Lana Habash, Let’s Go There Collective
Lana Khoury, Washington DC
Yousef Aljamal, University of Malaysia 
Safwan Hamdi
Leena Barakat
Lema Nazeeh, lawyer
Yara Kayyali Abbas, Palestine
Mariam Barghouti, Birzeit University
Mohammad Ayyad, graduate student, SOAS
Nader Elkhuzundar
Nancy Mansour, Existence is Resistance, New York/Palestine
Mohammed Alkhader, Birzeit University
Nazik Hassan, attorney, Riverside, California
Nora Taha
Rena Zuabi
Roleen Tafakji-Haidami
Samera Sood
Sana Ibrahim
Sherene Seikaly, UCSB
Taher Herzallah
Tamara Reem, Washington DC
Ahmad Nimer, Palestine
Riya Al’sanah, journalist, London
Alaa Milbes, Ramallah
Belal Dabour, Gaza doctor
Huda Asfour, PhD, Durham NC
Iyad Afalqa, Irvine, CA
Ruba Leech, Portland, OR
Rashad Al-Dabbagh, Network of Arab American Professionals
Maysoon Suleiman-Khatib, Civil Rights Specialist
Diana Alzeer, Ramallah, Palestine
Mona Kadah, Boston MA
Lucy Garbett, Jerusalem, Palestine
Hadeel Assali, Columbia University, NYC
Magid Shihade, Oakland, CA
Tamara Tamimi, Palestine
Hammam Farah, psychotherapist and editor
Dina Elmuti, Treatment and Rehabilitation Center for Victims of Torture
Laila Hamdan, Portland OR
Bushra Shamma, VA, USA
Rev. Fahed Abuakel, Presbyterian minister , Atlanta, GA
Rehab Nazzal, artist, Canada
Ezees Silwady, Palestine
Dua’ Nakhala, freelance researcher, Belgium
Amal Oweis, Palestine
Shaheen Nassar, UCR
Amin Dallal, youth counselor
Dr. Tariq Shadid, surgeon
Zaha Hassan, Esq
Randa Issa, PhD
Murad Saleh, GED
Lila Sharif, Ph.D
Sa’ed Atshan, Ph.D
Rasha Khoury, MD Jerusalem
Hadeel Assali, Columbia University, NYC
Rabab Ibrahim Abdulhadi, Associate Professor of Race and Resistance Studies, San Francisco University
Tanya Keilani
Shahd Abusalama
Organizations
American Muslims for Palestine
Free Amer Jubran Campaign
International Solidarity Movement, Palestine
Let’s Go There Collective
Samidoun Palestinian Prisoner Solidarity Network
Students for Justice in Palestine, University of New Mexico
The Campaign to Free Ahmad Sa’adat
Bay Area Intifada, Bay Area
PAWA, Palestinian American Women Association
NSJP, National Students for Justice in Palestine
Americans United for Palestinian Human Rights
Mashjar Juthour, Palestine
Harvard Palestine Solidarity Committee
Al-Awda NY, the Palestine Right to Return Coalition 
Stop the Wall
The US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel
SourcePhoto: Hamde Abu expresses solidarity with Ferguson.

thepeoplesrecord:

Palestinians express solidarity with the people of Ferguson
August 17, 2014

We the undersigned Palestinian individuals and groups express our solidarity with the family of Michael Brown, a young unarmed black man gunned down by police on August 9th in Ferguson, Missouri. We wish to express our support and solidarity with the people of Ferguson who have taken their struggle to the street, facing a militarized police occupation.

From all factions and sectors of our dislocated society, we send you our commitment to stand with you in your hour of pain and time of struggle against the oppression that continues to target our black brothers and sisters in nearly every aspect of their lives.

We understand your moral outrage. We empathize with your hurt and anger. We understand the impulse to rebel against the infrastructure of a racist capitalist system that systematically pushes you to the margins of humanity.  

And we stand with you.

We recognize the disregard and disrespect for black bodies and black life endemic to the supremacist system that rules the land with wanton brutality. Your struggles through the ages have been an inspiration to us as we fight our own battles for basic human dignities. We continue to find inspiration and strength from your struggles through the ages and your revolutionary leaders, like Malcolm X, Huey Newton, Kwame Ture, Angela Davis, Fred Hampton, Bobby Seale and others.

We honor the life of Michael Brown, cut short less than a week before he was due to begin university.  And we honor the far too many more killed in similar circumstances, motivated by racism and contempt for black life: Ezell Ford, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Tarika Wilson, Malcolm Ferguson, Renisha McBride, Amadou Diallo, Yvette Smith, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell, Kathryn Johnston, Rekia Boyd and too many others to count.

With a Black Power fist in the air, we salute the people of Ferguson and join in your demands for justice.

Signatories

  • Susan Abulhawa, novelist and activist
  • Linah Alsaafin, graduate student, SOAS
  • Budour Hassan
  • Rinad Abdulla, Professor, Birzeit University
  • Ramzy Baroud, Managing Editor, Middle East Eye
  • Diana Buttu, Lawyer, Palestine
  • Rana Baker, graduate student, SOAS
  • Abbas Hamideh, activist and organizer
  • Abir Kopty
  • Ahlam Muhtaseb, Professor, CSU
  • Alaa Milbes, Ramallah, Palestine
  • Alaa Marwan, Ramallah, Palestine
  • Nour Joudah, Washington DC
  • Ali Zbeidat, Sakhnin, Palestine
  • Areej Alragabi , Jerusalem, Palestine
  • Areej Saeb, student, Jerusalem
  • Asma Jaber
  • Beesan Ramadan, Nablus
  • Dina Zbidat, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Dr Jess Ghannam, UCSF
  • Huwaida Arraf, Attorney, New York
  • Nejma Awad, Tetra Tech DPK
  • Monadel Herzallah, USPCN, San Francisco Bay Area
  • Ghassan Hussein
  • Dinna Omar
  • Randa C. Issa
  • Amal Khoury, MD MPH, Washington, DC
  • Amani Barakat Moorpark, California
  • Fadi Quran 
  • Fajr Harb
  • Falastine Dwikat, PCACBI
  • Hala Gabriel
  • Khaled Jarrar
  • Osama Ahmad, AMP Bay Area director
  • Hala Turjman
  • Halla Shoaibi, Birzeit University
  • Harun Arsalai  
  • Zaid Shuaibi
  • Hurriyah Ziada
  • Dima Eleiwa, Shujaiyah, Gaza, Palestine
  • Jamil Salem, Birzeit University
  • Karam Saleem, International Solidarity Movement, Palestine
  • Khaled Barakat
  • Khuzama Hanoon, Palestine
  • Laila Awartani, Ramallah, Palestine
  • Lana Habash, Let’s Go There Collective
  • Lana Khoury, Washington DC
  • Yousef Aljamal, University of Malaysia 
  • Safwan Hamdi
  • Leena Barakat
  • Lema Nazeeh, lawyer
  • Yara Kayyali Abbas, Palestine
  • Mariam Barghouti, Birzeit University
  • Mohammad Ayyad, graduate student, SOAS
  • Nader Elkhuzundar
  • Nancy Mansour, Existence is Resistance, New York/Palestine
  • Mohammed Alkhader, Birzeit University
  • Nazik Hassan, attorney, Riverside, California
  • Nora Taha
  • Rena Zuabi
  • Roleen Tafakji-Haidami
  • Samera Sood
  • Sana Ibrahim
  • Sherene Seikaly, UCSB
  • Taher Herzallah
  • Tamara Reem, Washington DC
  • Ahmad Nimer, Palestine
  • Riya Al’sanah, journalist, London
  • Alaa Milbes, Ramallah
  • Belal Dabour, Gaza doctor
  • Huda Asfour, PhD, Durham NC
  • Iyad Afalqa, Irvine, CA
  • Ruba Leech, Portland, OR
  • Rashad Al-Dabbagh, Network of Arab American Professionals
  • Maysoon Suleiman-Khatib, Civil Rights Specialist
  • Diana Alzeer, Ramallah, Palestine
  • Mona Kadah, Boston MA
  • Lucy Garbett, Jerusalem, Palestine
  • Hadeel Assali, Columbia University, NYC
  • Magid Shihade, Oakland, CA
  • Tamara Tamimi, Palestine
  • Hammam Farah, psychotherapist and editor
  • Dina Elmuti, Treatment and Rehabilitation Center for Victims of Torture
  • Laila Hamdan, Portland OR
  • Bushra Shamma, VA, USA
  • Rev. Fahed Abuakel, Presbyterian minister , Atlanta, GA
  • Rehab Nazzal, artist, Canada
  • Ezees Silwady, Palestine
  • Dua’ Nakhala, freelance researcher, Belgium
  • Amal Oweis, Palestine
  • Shaheen Nassar, UCR
  • Amin Dallal, youth counselor
  • Dr. Tariq Shadid, surgeon
  • Zaha Hassan, Esq
  • Randa Issa, PhD
  • Murad Saleh, GED
  • Lila Sharif, Ph.D
  • Sa’ed Atshan, Ph.D
  • Rasha Khoury, MD Jerusalem
  • Hadeel Assali, Columbia University, NYC
  • Rabab Ibrahim Abdulhadi, Associate Professor of Race and Resistance Studies, San Francisco University
  • Tanya Keilani
  • Shahd Abusalama

Organizations

  • American Muslims for Palestine
  • Free Amer Jubran Campaign
  • International Solidarity Movement, Palestine
  • Let’s Go There Collective
  • Samidoun Palestinian Prisoner Solidarity Network
  • Students for Justice in Palestine, University of New Mexico
  • The Campaign to Free Ahmad Sa’adat
  • Bay Area Intifada, Bay Area
  • PAWA, Palestinian American Women Association
  • NSJP, National Students for Justice in Palestine
  • Americans United for Palestinian Human Rights
  • Mashjar Juthour, Palestine
  • Harvard Palestine Solidarity Committee
  • Al-Awda NY, the Palestine Right to Return Coalition 
  • Stop the Wall
  • The US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel

Source
Photo: Hamde Abu expresses solidarity with Ferguson.

badwolfkaily:

Robin McLaurin Williams (July 21, 1951 – August 11, 2014)

"You’re only given one little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it."

royalprat:

wryer:

Giant driftwood on the beach at La Push, Washington (2010)

this made me feel really uneasy, the ocean is terrifying.

its like when cats bring home a dead bird and drop it at your feet except the ocean is like I HAVE BROUGHT YOU THIS ENORMOUS TREE FROM THE DEPTHS OF HELL ENJOY

vurtual:

African Lion (by Tony)

veganonabike24:

onlylolgifs:

Adorable Sugar Glider Trevor eats orange and falls asleep

omg <3